RIDDLE POSTS BY TAG: 'RIDDLES'

Exeter Riddle 94

MEGANCAVELL

Date: Wed 09 Jun 2021
Matching Commentaries: Commentary for Exeter Riddle 94
Riddle 94’s translation is by Erin Sebo, senior lecturer in English at Flinders University in Australia.

Original text:
Smeþr[. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .]ad,
hyrre þonne heofon[. . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . ]           glædre þonne sunne,
[ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ] style,
5       smeare þonne sealt ry[ . . . . . . . . . . . ]
leofre þonne þis leoht eall,           leohtre þon w[ . . . . ]
Translation:
Smoother [. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .]
higher than heaven [. . . . . . . . .
. . . . . . . . . . ]           brighter than the sun,
[ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ] … steel
5       sharper than salt [ . . . . . . . . . . . ]
dearer than all this light, lighter than the w[ind]
Click to show riddle solution?
Creation


Notes:

This riddle appears on folio 130v of The Exeter Book.

The above Old English text is based on this edition: Elliott van Kirk Dobbie and George Philip Krapp, eds, The Exeter Book, Anglo-Saxon Poetic Records 3 (New York: Columbia University Press, 1936), page 242.

Note that this edition numbers the text Riddle 90: Craig Williamson, ed., The Old English Riddles of the Exeter Book (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1977), page 120.



Tags: anglo saxon  exeter book  riddles  old english  solutions  erin sebo  riddle 94 

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Exeter Riddle 66
Commentary for Exeter Riddle 94

Aldhelm Riddle 94: Ebulus

ALEXANDRAREIDER

Date: Thu 14 Apr 2022
Original text:

Sambucus, in silva putris dum fronde virescit,
Est mihi par foliis; nam glesco surculus arvis
Nigros bacarum portans in fronte corimbos.
Quem medici multum ruris per terga virentem,
Cum scabies morbi pulpas irrepserit aegras,
Lustrantes orbem crebro quaesisse feruntur:
Cladibus horrendae, dum vexat viscera tabo,
Ne virus serpat, possum succurrere, leprae,
Sic olidas hominum restaurans germine fibras.

Translation:

The elder tree, when it grows, putrid, in the woods,
Is like me in its leaves; for I grow as a sprig in the fields,
Carrying black bunches of berries on my brow.
Doctors, when the roughness of disease creeps on to sick skin,
Are said frequently to have sought much of me, 
Growing green, by roaming the world around the back country: 
I am able to bring remedy so that the poison of leprosy, horrendous in its harm
When it irritates the insides with pestilence, does not progress,
Thus restoring fetid bowels with my sprout.

Click to show riddle solution?
Wallwort


Notes:

This edition is based on Rudolf Ehwald, ed. Aldhelmi Opera Omnia. Monumenta Germaniae Historica, Auctores Antiquissimi, 15. Berlin: Weidmann, 1919, pages 59-150. Available online here



Tags: riddles  latin  Aldhelm 

Commentary for Exeter Riddle 94

MEGANCAVELL

Date: Wed 09 Jun 2021
Matching Riddle: Exeter Riddle 94

Riddle 94’s commentary is also by Erin Sebo, senior lecturer in English at Flinders University in Australia. Take it away, Erin!

Riddle 94 is one of the most fragmented riddles in the Exeter Book. It is often ignored and even left out of translations, such as in Kevin Crossley-Holland’s excellent translation. Just enough survives for it to be identified as a creation riddle, a version of the same idea found in Riddles 40 and 66. Which seems to make it even less interesting: why waste time on a few disconnected words when we have two complete versions of the riddle already as well as Aldhelm’s original Latin version?!

But, actually, the fact we have something to compare this riddle to – an absolute luxury in Old English literature – means that it is possible to learn things that we can’t with texts that survive in one version (or one manuscript!). In this case – as I argued in my book – because we have different versions of the same text, we can see a range of different popular cosmological and astronomical ideas, and possibly even get a hint of how these ideas changed over time.

Night sky with stars rotating

Photo of stars rotating (by Jordan Condon) from Wikimedia Commons (licence: CC BY 3.0).

Riddle 94 draws on much of the imagery of Riddles 40 and 66 and is also based around a series of comparatives, but the form is simplified, perhaps suggesting it was composed later or had circulated in popular culture. Often we have lost what is being compared but we can still tell the order of these images – and that’s revealing. For example, the riddles doesn’t begin with the large celestial comparatives “higher than heaven” and “brighter than the sun.” Both are demoted to after whatever thing was designated “smoother.” It’s an odd choice. The other creation riddles start with the celestial…and what could the universe be smeþr (smoother) than that could be theologically and cosmologically important enough to earn it a place above the heavens and the sun? There is no other instance of smeðe in its comparative form in the Old English corpus so the comparison was not common. Obviously, this riddle was doing something new.

The seven surviving adjectives in Riddle 94 are: smeþr (smoother), hyrre (higher), glædre (brighter), smeare (sharper), leofre (dearer) and leohtre (lighter). Since these are virtually all we have to go on, it’s worth looking at how they’re used elsewhere. The first, smoother is not found in Riddles 40 or 66, but Aldhelm and Symphosius use a Latin equivalent, teres (smooth), for the stars – in Aldhelm’s Enigma 100, De Creatura (line 57) and the horn casing of a lantern in Symphosius’s Enigma 67, Lanterna (line 1), respectively. The next adjective, higher, in very common and usually contrasts heaven or heavenly things with infernal depths. Brighter, the next, refers to the sun. It seems the obvious adjective to moderns but actually the sun is usually described as swift in Old English poetry. (Riddle 66 describes the moon as brighter!)

late medieval drawing of sun and moon

Sun vs Moon in a late 15th-century calendar by Johannes von Gmunden from Wikimedia Commons (public domain).

Smeare, especially in the metaphorical sense in which it applies to salt, is absent from earlier creation riddles, though Aldhelm makes saltiness a comparative in its own right. Leofre is equally absent from Riddle 94’s antecedents and it is the first instance of a “subjective” quality: something may only be dear if it is dear to someone. Leohtre, the last, is more fraught since we can’t be sure if it’s used in the sense of “brighter” or “less weighty.”

These last two form the most complete line of the fragment: “dearer than all this light, lighter than…” Unlike the other Creation riddles which have dualistic parings, this seems to be associative – for a sense of how unusual this is, it’s worth comparing it with “religious” cosmological descriptions. The most influential of these is the creation of the world in the Book of Genesis which works through a hierarchy of oppositions, starting with the division of earth and heaven, then light, then sky from sea, then sea from land. This basic structure is echoed elsewhere, such as this description of God’s power in Homily 5 of the Vercelli Book: his miht is ufor þonne heofon & bradre þonne eorðe & deopre þonne sæ & leohtre þonne heofones tungel (Scragg, page 121, line 194) (…His might is higher than heaven, and broader than the earth, and deeper than the sea and lighter than Heaven’s star).

This is a version of the “creation comparatives,” which conforms to the Christian structure and order of the images in Genesis. God makes Heaven (ufor þonne heofon), then separates the land (bradre þonne eorðe) from the sea (deopre þonne sæ) and then sets the celestial bodies on their trajectory (leohtre þonne heofones tungel).

Although this riddle in its fragmented state is easy to ignore, it survived long after most of the Exeter Book riddles were forgotten (except by scholars). Unlike most of the Exeter riddles, Riddle 94 is the first which is not characterized by word pictures, instead favouring a stable structure into which any number of formulaic elements may be fitted. This makes it far better suited to popular riddle-telling (as opposed to riddle reading) than most in the Exeter Book. And that’s what happened. The question implicit in Riddle 94’s statement that Creation is “higher than heaven” becomes overt in a 1430 lyric “Inter Diabolus et Virgo”* (Rawlinson MS. D. 328, folio 174b): “What ys hyer than ys…?” Each adjective is turned into its own question and new adjectives are added. The lyric survives as a ballad into the 19th century, when it was collected by the folklorist Francis James Child who made it the first ballad in his monumental collection, The English and Scottish Popular Ballads, under the title “Riddles Wisely Expounded”. Anything set to music tends to survive and you can even find the very last traces of “Riddles Wisely Expounded” in Tom Waits’ 2006 recording of “Two sisters” on Orphans: brawlers, bawlers and bastards (Sebo, page. 136). Go have a listen!

*Don’t @ me, I know what case inter takes.

Notes:

References and Suggested Reading:

Crossley-Holland, Kevin, trans. The Exeter Book Riddles. London: Enitharmon, 2008.

Scragg, D. G., ed. The Vercelli Homilies and Related Texts. Early English Text Society 300. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992.

Sebo, Erin. In Enigmate: The History of a Riddle, 400–1500. Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2018.



Tags: anglo saxon  exeter book  riddles  old english  solutions  erin sebo  riddle 94 

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Exeter Riddle 95

MEGANCAVELL

Date: Wed 17 Feb 2021
Matching Commentaries: Commentary for Exeter Riddle 95

Riddle 95’s translation is by Brett Roscoe of The King’s University, Alberta. Thanks for taking on the very last Exeter riddle, Brett!



Original text:
Ic eom indryhten           ond eorlum cuð,
ond reste oft;           ricum ond heanum,
folcum gefræge           fere (1) wide,
ond me fremdes (2) ær           freondum stondeð (3)
5     hiþendra hyht,           gif ic habban sceal
blæd in burgum           oþþe beorhtne god. (4)
Nu snottre men           swiþast lufiaþ
midwist mine;           ic monigum sceal
wisdom cyþan;           no þær word sprecað
10     ænig ofer eorðan.           Þeah nu ælda bearn
londbuendra           lastas mine
swiþe secað,           ic swaþe hwilum
mine bemiþe           monna gehwylcum.
Translation:
I am noble and known to men of rank,
and I rest often; to rich and poor,
to people far and wide I am known,
and to me, formerly estranged from friends, remains
5     the hope of plunderers, if I should have
honour in the cities or bright wealth.
Now wise men above all cherish
my company; to many I must
tell of wisdom, where they speak not a word,
10     nothing throughout the earth. Though now the sons of men,
sons of land-dwellers, eagerly seek
my tracks, I sometimes hide
my trail from all of them.
Click to show riddle solution?
Book, Quill Pen, Riddle (Book), Wandering Singer, Prostitute, Moon


Notes:

This riddle appears on folio 130v of The Exeter Book.

The above Old English text is based on this edition: Elliott van Kirk Dobbie and George Philip Krapp, eds, The Exeter Book, Anglo-Saxon Poetic Records 3 (New York: Columbia University Press, 1936), page 243.

Note that this edition numbers the text Riddle 91: Craig Williamson, ed., The Old English Riddles of the Exeter Book (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1977), pages 120-1.

Translation Notes:

  • (1) The manuscript reads fereð. Williamson takes hiþendra hyht as the subject of fereð wide, translating, “The plunderers’ joy (gold) travels far, and, once estranged from friends, stands on me (shines from me?), if I should have glory in the cities or bright wealth” (pp. 398-99). Murphy translates, “The plunderer’s joy travels widely and stands as a friend to me, who was a stranger’s before, if I am to have success in the cities or possess the bright Lord.” See Patrick J. Murphy’s Unriddling the Exeter Riddles (University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2011), page 87.
  • (2) The manuscript fremdes does not make sense because there is no genitive noun in the sentence. I follow Williamson’s suggestion in reading this as fremde (pages 399-400).
  • (3) Stondeð literally means “stands,” so a literal translation would be “stands on me.” But the meaning may be understood as “remains (to me)” or “falls to my lot” (Williamson, page 400).
  • (4) Here I have followed the suggestion of numerous editors in assuming that beorthne should be beorhte, an adjective describing god, which here means “goods” or “wealth.” See Williamson, page 401.


Tags: anglo saxon  exeter book  riddles  old english  solutions  brett roscoe  riddle 95 

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Aldhelm Riddle 95: Scilla

ALEXANDRAREIDER

Date: Thu 14 Apr 2022
Original text:

Ecce, molosorum nomen mihi fata dederunt
(Argolicae gentis sic promit lingua loquelis),
Ex quo me dirae fallebant carmina Circae,
Quae fontis liquidi maculabat flumina verbis:
Femora cum cruribus, suras cum poplite bino
Abstulit immiscens crudelis verba virago.
Pignora nunc pavidi referunt ululantia nautae,
Tonsis dum trudunt classes et caerula findunt
Vastos verrentes fluctus grassante procella,
Palmula qua remis succurrit panda per undas,
Auscultare procul, quae latrant inguina circum.
Sic me pellexit dudum Titania proles,
Ut merito vivam salsis in fluctibus exul.

Translation:

Behold, the Fates gave me the name of dogs
(Thus does the language of the Argive people express it in speech),
After the songs of frightful Circe deceived me,
She who sullied the streams from the flowing fountain with words:
Thighs as well as shins, calves with both knees, 
The cruel woman removed, joining words.
Fearful sailors now tell of the howling offspring—
When the fleets drive through with oars and cleave the sea,
Sweeping along the vast waves as the storm advances,
And the curved blade of the oar runs through the waves—
That they hear far away, which bay around my loins.
Thus did Titania’s progeny once deceive me,
Such that I deservedly live as an exile in the salt-waves.

Click to show riddle solution?
Scylla


Notes:

This edition is based on Rudolf Ehwald, ed. Aldhelmi Opera Omnia. Monumenta Germaniae Historica, Auctores Antiquissimi, 15. Berlin: Weidmann, 1919, pages 59-150. Available online here



Tags: riddles  latin  Aldhelm 

Commentary for Exeter Riddle 95

MEGANCAVELL

Date: Thu 18 Feb 2021
Matching Riddle: Exeter Riddle 95

Riddle 95’s commentary is by Brett Roscoe of The King’s University, Alberta. Go get’em, Brett!

If you like reading riddles, and I mean really like reading them, and you have a habit of reading them over and over again, then this riddle is for you. The last riddle in the Exeter Book is one of those infamous riddles that has (too) many possible answers. Rather than single out one solution, I think it would be best to try on one solution at a time, like shoes, so we can get a feel for how each fits the riddle.

Medieval Scandinavian leather shoes

Like these medieval shoes? Photo of Scandinavian shoes from the National Museum of Denmark, with thanks to Prof. Michael J. Fuller for permission to display them here.

This means that for each solution, the riddle has to be re-read and its details reconsidered, because with each solution the riddle is a new riddle. And so without further ado (and since we have much to do!), let’s begin:

First, the Wandering Singer. A wandering singer is known “far and wide” (fere wide; line 3b), and his lore is valued by “wise men” (snottre men; 7a). The “hope of plunderers” (hiþendra hyht; 5a) can be read as a kenning (a poetic circumlocution, or a way of hinting at something without actually saying it) meaning gold, the payment for which a wandering singer hopes. Finally, a wandering singer may want to hide his tracks if he has been exiled or has reason to fear for his life.

The problem with this solution, in my mind, is that it is too literal. If the Exeter Book riddles are any indication, early medieval riddlers enjoyed using metaphor, paradox, and word-play to trick the riddlee. We have to make our way through figurative twists and turns to get at the answer. And to me the answer of a wandering singer just seems a bit too easy.

Now let’s read the riddle again, this time with Prostitute as the answer. Kevin Kiernan, the scholar who suggests this solution, argues that the lastas in line 11 are “observances” or practices rather than “tracks.” So the speaker hides her practices from others. The hiþendra hyht, which Kiernan translates “the joy of ravagers,” may be a kenning for sexual gratification. With lots of clients, a prostitute can be known “far and wide.” And we can probably guess what happens in a place where “not a word” (no…word) is spoken (9b)!

The intriguing thing about this riddle solution is that it is not exclusive. A number of the Exeter Book riddles have two possible answers, one sexual, intended to make the audience blush, and one more “appropriate,” so to speak (see Riddles 25, 37, 44, 45, 54, 61, 62, and 87). So perhaps Riddle 95 also has two answers, “prostitute” and something less prone to make people blush. Ultimately, however, I don’t find this solution convincing because there is an important difference between the dual-answer riddles and Riddle 95: the sexual content in them is very explicit, even obvious, whereas in Riddle 95 it is difficult to see. That is, if the sexual content is really there at all.

Waxing half-moon over water

A very nice image of the moon from Wikimedia Commons (public domain).

Ready to read the riddle again? This time, the solution to keep in mind is Moon. As lord of the night sky, the moon could certainly be called indryhten (noble; 1a). It is seen by the rich and poor alike, and when the morning comes, it fades, hiding its tracks (15-16). Frederick Tupper Jr., the strongest supporter of the “moon” solution, points to a number of similarities between this riddle and Riddle 29 (page 104). In both riddles, Tupper observes, the moon is famous, known to all who live on the earth; in both the moon possesses plunder or booty, which is another way of saying that the moon captures light from the sun; and in both the moon disappears from sight, in Riddle 95 hiding its tracks from those who would follow. Moreover, in both riddles the moon desires to settle comfortably in a burg (city) (try comparing lines 5b-6 to Riddle 29's lines 5-6).

This solution, besides fitting a number of the riddles’ details, has the added benefit of being a bit romantic, inviting us to picture a moonlit, starry night. But it is difficult to see what wisdom the moon is supposed to tell of or why wise men would cherish it (lines 7-9a), unless these lines somehow refer to the practice of astrology.

And now it’s time to read the riddle yet again, this time keeping in mind the solution Book. Craig Williamson, a strong supporter of this solution, argues that the hiþendra hyht (which he translates “plunderers’ joy”) refers to gold used as gilding on a book. According to Williamson the gold is the subject of fereð wide (travels far; 3b); it leaves its home (when it is mined) and, separated from its friends (other gold?), is taken far away to be used in book illumination. The idea of gold traveling may seem strange, but there may be a parallel in Riddle 83 (if gold is accepted as the solution). Finally, Riddle 95 says that the gold stondeð (literally “stands”) on the book, which probably means that the gold is gilded onto the pages.

Ornate cover of Lindisfarne Gospels

This decorative binding was added to the Lindisfarne Gospels in the 19th century, since the original treasure case went missing. Photo of London, British Library, Cotton Nero D IV © British Library.

If you’ve been reading the Exeter Book riddles in order, then by the time you get to the last lines of Riddle 95 you might experience déjà vu. That’s because the following of a last (track, footstep) or swaþu (track, trail, trace) is also mentioned in Riddles 26 (lines 7b-9a) and 51 (lines 2b-3a). The answers to these riddles (spoiler alert!) are likely a book or Bible and a quill pen, respectively. So given the link we’ve noticed between these riddles and Riddle 95, we can argue that the solution to Riddle 95 is probably also one of these.

So it’s time to – yes, you’ve guessed it – read the riddle again! This time we can imagine a Quill Pen as the solution. The ink is used to write books that are known to many people (lines 1-2). The hiþendra hyht (hope of plunderers) refers to the ink which is plundered by the pen. Or if the hope of plunderers is the subject of fereð wide (see Murphy’s rendering in the translation note), then it refers to the quill pen itself, a pen that fereð wide (travels widely) over the page as it writes, like a bird flying over the page. Murphy points out that Riddle 26 contains a similar kenning, fugles wyn (bird’s joy), which means a feather. This reading is given extra weight by the fact that a number of riddles, both Old English and Latin, associate birds with writing (for an Old English example see Riddle 26; for Latin examples see Aldhelm’s Riddle 59, Eusebius’ Riddle 35, and Tatwine’s Riddle 6).

There’s just one problem. If the answer to Riddle 95 is a book or a quill pen, why does it sometimes hide its tracks? These lines may refer to the fact that books, and writing in general, can sometimes be elitist, written in a way that only the learned can understand. And sometimes even the learned have trouble understanding what is written. Let’s face it – sometimes texts are confusing, whether they intend to be or not. And to find perfect examples, we need look no further than the Exeter Book riddles themselves. Multiple solutions, manuscript damage, translation difficulties, and cultural differences are just a few of the challenges that face readers of the Old English riddles. And what’s more, the riddle genre deliberately tries to trick its audience, adding an extra layer of difficulty.

The riddles are such a good example of hidden tracks that some have actually solved Riddle 95 as Riddle or Riddle Book. This solution is fitting for the last riddle in the Exeter Book collection, as it invites us to reflect on the nature of riddles. Riddles teach “wisdom” (line 9) by challenging the way we view the world. They encourage us to see a cuckoo as an orphan and an anchor as an exile, to see the suffering of a plough and the wisdom of ink, in short, to see the world afresh and anew, never settling for a “normal” perspective. The Old English riddles in particular invite us to read them again and again, partly because we don’t always agree on the solutions, but also because of the beauty of the poetry. A riddle offers joy to the plunderer (hiþendra hyht), even if we already know the solution.

Front panel of Franks Casket with runic inscription and engraved figures

An image of the delightfully enigmatic Franks Casket with its runic whale riddle from Wikimedia Commons (licence: CC BY 2.0).

Notes:

References and Suggested Reading:

Erhardt-Siebold, Erika von. “Old English Riddle No. 95.” Modern Language Notes, vol. 62 (1947), pages 558-9.

Kiernan, Kevin S. “Cwene: The Old Profession of Exeter Riddle 95.” Modern Philology, vol. 72, issue 4 (1975), pages 384-9.

Murphy, Patrick J. Unriddling the Exeter Riddles. University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 2011.

Tupper, Frederick Jr. “Solutions of the Exeter Book Riddles.” Modern Language Notes, vol. 21, issue 4 (1906), pages 97-105.

Williamson, Craig, ed. The Old English Riddles of the Exeter Book. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1977.

Note that you may also wish to read this article, which was published after this commentary post was first written:

Bitterli, Dieter. "Exeter Book Riddle 95: ‘The Sun’, a New Solution." Anglia, vol. 137, issue 4 (2019), pages 612-38.



Tags: anglo saxon  exeter book  riddles  old english  solutions  brett roscoe  riddle 95 

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Aldhelm Riddle 96: Elefans

ALEXANDRAREIDER

Date: Thu 14 Apr 2022
Original text:

Ferratas acies et denso milite turmas,
Bellandi miseros stimulat quos vana cupido,
Dum maculare student armis pia foedera regni
Salpix et sorbet ventosis flatibus auras
Raucaque clangenti resultant classica sistro,
Cernere non pavidus didici trux murmura Martis.
Quamquam me turpem nascendi fecerit auctor,
Editus ex alvo dum sumpsi munera vitae,
Ecce tamen morti successit gloria formae,
Letifer in fibras dum finis serpat apertas;
Bratea non auri fulvis pretiosa metallis,
Quamvis gemmarum constent ornata lucernis,
Vincere, non quibunt falerarum floribus umquam.
Me flecti genibus fessum natura negavit
Poplite seu curvo palpebris tradere somnos,
Quin potius vitam compellor degere stando.

Translation:

The iron-covered battle lines and throngs of crowded soldiers,
The wretches whom the vain desire for fighting spurs on,
When they strive to dishonour the holy treaties of the kingdom with weapons,
And the trumpet sucks in the airs with windy gusts
And the harsh instruments echo with sounding call:
Wild, I learned to regard the rumble of Mars unafraid.
Although the creator made me unsightly at birth,
When, tall out of the womb, I assumed the gifts of life,
Behold: the glory of my shape nevertheless succeeds upon my death,
When the death-bringing end creeps into my open insides;
Precious golden foils with amber metals,
Although they be decorated with the shine of gems, 
Are never able to surpass me at the zenith of ornamentations.
Nature refused me kneeling when tired
And entrusting sleep to my eyelids on curved knee;
Even more, I am compelled to pass my life standing.

Click to show riddle solution?
Elephant


Notes:

This edition is based on Rudolf Ehwald, ed. Aldhelmi Opera Omnia. Monumenta Germaniae Historica, Auctores Antiquissimi, 15. Berlin: Weidmann, 1919, pages 59-150. Available online here



Tags: riddles  latin  Aldhelm 

Aldhelm Riddle 97: Nox

ALEXANDRAREIDER

Date: Thu 14 Apr 2022
Original text:

Florida me genuit nigrantem corpore tellus
Et nil fecundum stereli de viscere promo,
Quamvis Eumenidum narrantes carmine vates
Tartaream partu testentur gignere prolem.
Nulla mihi constat certi substantia partus,
Sed modo quadratum complector caerula mundum.
Est inimica mihi, quae cunctis constat amica,
Saecula dum lustrat, lampas Titania Phoebi;
Diri latrones me semper amare solebant,
Quos gremio tectos nitor defendere fusco.
Vergilium constat caram cecinisse sororem:
"Ingrediturque solo et caput inter nubila condit
Monstrum horrendum, ingens, cui quot sunt corpore plumae,
Tot vigiles oculi subter, mirabile dictu,
Tot linguae, totidem ora sonant, tot subrigit auris;
Nocte volat caeli medio terraeque per umbras."

Translation:

Blooming earth bore me, black, from her body
And I produce nothing fertile from my sterile insides,
Although the poets, telling of the Eumenides in verse,
Testify that I begot the Tartarean race in birth.
No substance of certain birth belongs to me,
But I presently embrace the four-part world with darkness.
The Titanian lantern of Phoebus, who exists as a friend to all
As it roams the world, is inimical to me;
Cruel thieves, whom I work to protect in my dark bosom,
Always tend to love me.
It is known that Vergil sang this of my dear sister:
"And she walks on land and conceals her head among the crowds,
A horrendous monster, huge, on whose body there are so many feathers,
So many vigilant eyes underneath, miraculous to say,
So many tongues, the same number of mouths sound, and so many ears perked up;
At night she flies through the shadows, in-between heaven and earth."

Click to show riddle solution?
Night


Notes:

This edition is based on Rudolf Ehwald, ed. Aldhelmi Opera Omnia. Monumenta Germaniae Historica, Auctores Antiquissimi, 15. Berlin, Weidmann, 1919, pages 59-150. Available online here



Tags: riddles  latin  Aldhelm 

Aldhelm Riddle 98: Elleborus

ALEXANDRAREIDER

Date: Thu 14 Apr 2022
Original text:

Ostriger en arvo vernabam frondibus hirtis
Conquilio similis: sic cocci murice rubro
Purpureus stillat sanguis de palmite guttis.
Exuvias vitae mandenti tollere nolo
Mitia nec penitus spoliabunt mente venena;
Sed tamen insanum vexat dementia cordis,
Dum rotat in giro vecors vertigine membra.

Translation:

Behold: purple, I bloom in the field with shaggy leaves.
I am similar to an oyster: thus with red dye of scarlet 
A purple blood drips in drops from my branch.
I do not wish to take prizes of life from the one chewing me,
Nor do my sweet poisons totally strip him of mind;
And yet madness of the heart afflicts the insane,
When he spins his limbs around, foolish with dizziness.

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Hellebore


Notes:

This edition is based on Rudolf Ehwald, ed. Aldhelmi Opera Omnia. Monumenta Germaniae Historica, Auctores Antiquissimi, 15. Berlin: Weidmann, 1919, pages 59-150. Available online here



Tags: riddles  latin  Aldhelm 

Aldhelm Riddle 99: Camellus

ALEXANDRAREIDER

Date: Thu 14 Apr 2022
Original text:

Consul eram quondam, Romanus miles equester
Arbiter imperio dum regni sceptra regebat;
Nunc onus horrendum reportant corpora gippi
Et premit immensum truculentae sarcina molis.
Terreo cornipedum nunc velox agmen equorum,
Qui trepidi fugiunt mox quadripedante meatu,
Dum trucis aspectant immensos corporis artus.

Translation:

Once I was consul, when the Roman equestrian soldier was
Judge, governed the scepters of power with his command.
Now my body bears the horrible burden of a hump
And an excess of cruel weight presses with its burden.
Now I terrify a swift company of horn-footed horses,
Who presently flee in trepidation from my four-footed course,
When they look upon the immense limbs of my wild body. 

Click to show riddle solution?
Camel


Notes:

This edition is based on Rudolf Ehwald, ed. Aldhelmi Opera Omnia. Monumenta Germaniae Historica, Auctores Antiquissimi, 15. Berlin: Weidmann, 1919, pages 59-150. Available online here



Tags: riddles  latin  Aldhelm 

Aldhelm Riddle 100: Creatura

ALEXANDRAREIDER

Date: Thu 14 Apr 2022
Original text:

Conditor, aeternis fulcit qui saecla columnis,
Rector regnorum, frenans et fulmina lege,
Pendula dum patuli vertuntur culmina caeli,
Me varium fecit, primo dum conderet orbem.
5     Pervigil excubiis: numquam dormire iuvabit,
Sed tamen extemplo clauduntur lumina somno;
Nam Deus ut propria mundum dicione gubernat,
Sic ego complector sub caeli cardine cuncta.
Segnior est nullus, quoniam me larbula terret,
10     Setigero rursus constans audacior apro;
Nullus me superat cupiens vexilla triumphi
Ni Deus, aethrali summus qui regnat in arce.
Prorsus odorato ture flagrantior halans
Olfactum ambrosiae, necnon crescentia glebae
15     Lilia purpureis possum conexa rosetis
Vincere spirantis nardi dulcedine plena;
Nunc olida caeni squalentis sorde putresco.
Omnia, quaeque polo sunt subter et axe reguntur,
Dum pater arcitenens concessit, jure guberno;
20     Grossas et graciles rerum comprenso figuras.
Altior, en, caelo rimor secreta Tonantis
Et tamen inferior terris tetra Tartara cerno;
Nam senior mundo praecessi tempora prisca,
Ecce, tamen matris horno generabar ab alvo
25     Pulchrior auratis, dum fulget fibula, bullis,
Horridior ramnis et spretis vilior algis.
Latior, en, patulis terrarum finibus exto
Et tamen in media concludor parte pugilli,
Frigidior brumis necnon candente pruina,
30     Cum sim Vulcani flammis torrentibus ardens,
Dulcior in palato quam lenti nectaris haustus
Dirior et rursus quam glauca absinthia campi.
Mando dapes mordax lurconum more Ciclopum,
Cum possim iugiter sine victu vivere felix.
35     Plus pernix aquilis, Zephiri velocior alis,
Necnon accipitre properantior, et tamen horrens
Lumbricus et limax et tarda testudo palustris
Atque, fimi soboles sordentis, cantarus ater
Me dicto citius vincunt certamine cursus.
40     Sum gravior plumbo: scopulorum pondera vergo;
Sum levior pluma, cedit cui tippula limphae;
Nam silici, densas quae fudit viscere flammas,
Durior aut ferro, tostis sed mollior extis.
Cincinnos capitis nam gesto cacumine nullos,
45     Ornent qui frontem pompis et tempora setis,
Cum mihi caesaries volitent de vertice crispae,
Plus calamistratis se comunt quae calamistro.
Pinguior, en, multo scrofarum axungia glesco,
Glandiferis iterum referunt dum corpora fagis
50     Atque saginata laetantur carne subulci;
Sed me dira famis macie torquebit egenam,
Pallida dum iugiter dapibus spoliabor opimis.
Limpida sum, fateor, Titanis clarior orbe,
Candidior nivibus, dum ningit vellera nimbus,
55     Carceris et multo tenebris obscurior atris
Atque latebrosis, ambit quas Tartarus, umbris.
Ut globus astrorum plasmor teres atque rotunda
Sperula seu pilae necnon et forma cristalli;
Et versa vice protendor ceu Serica pensa
60     In gracilem porrecta panum seu stamina pepli.
Senis, ecce, plagis, latus qua panditur orbis,
Ulterior multo tendor, mirabile fatu;
Infra me suprave nihil per saecula constat
Ni rerum genitor mundum sermone coercens.
65     Grandior in glaucis ballena fluctibus atra
Et minor exiguo, sulcat qui corpora, verme
Aut modico, Phoebi radiis qui vibrat, atomo;
Centenis pedibus gradior per gramina ruris
Et penitus numquam per terram pergo pedester.
70     Sic mea prudentes superat sapientia sofos,
Nec tamen in biblis docuit me littera dives
Aut umquam quivi, quid constet sillaba, nosse.
Siccior aestivo torrentis caumate solis,
Rore madens iterum plus uda flumine fontis;
75     Salsior et multo tumidi quam marmora ponti
Et gelidis terrae limphis insulsior erro,
Multiplici specie cunctorum compta colorum,
Ex quibus ornatur praesentis machina mundi,
Lurida cum toto nunc sim fraudata colore.
80     Auscultate mei credentes famina verbi,
Pandere quae poterit gnarus vix ore magister
Et tamen infitians non retur frivola lector!
Sciscitor inflatos, fungar quo nomine, sofos. 
EXPLICIUNT ENIGMATA.

Translation:

The creator, who supports the worlds on eternal columns, 
The ruler of kingdoms, controlling lightning with law, 
While the pendant peaks of wide heaven are rotated,
Made me, various, when he first founded the world.
5     Ever vigilant at the watch: it will never please me to sleep,
But rather my eyes are suddenly closed in dream;
For as God rules the world with his own pronouncement, 
So do I comprise all things under the pole of heaven.
Nothing is more sluggish, for a ghost terrifies me,
10     And in addition, I stand bolder than the bristly boar;
Nothing desiring the banner of triumph overcomes me
Except God, who reigns on high in his heavenly stronghold.
I am certainly more fragrant than perfumed incense, exhaling
The smell of ambrosia, and I am also able to surpass
15     The lilies, growing in the earth joined with red roses, 
By means of the full sweetness of the scent-giving nard;
And now I decay with the rank filth of squalid dirt.
Everything which is under the sky and are directed by its orbit
As the heavenly father permits I rule by right;
20     I include the thick and thin forms of things. 
Behold, higher than the sky, I can investigate the Thunderer’s secrets
And yet lower than the earth I can see gloomy Tartarus;
For, being older than the world, I preceded ancient time,
See, and yet I will be born from my mother’s womb this year;
25     I am more beautiful than golden bosses when a brooch gleams,
I am more horrible than bramble and more vile than contemptible seaweed.
Behold, I am more extensive than the wide ends of the earth
And yet I am confined in a handful,
And colder than winter and shining hoar-frost,
30     Though I burn in Vulcan’s blazing flames, 
I am sweeter on the palate than a taste of sticky nectar,
And on the other hand more dreadful than grey wormwood in the field.
Biting, I chew my meals in the manner of gluttonous Cyclops,
Though I can likewise live happily without food.
35     I am swifter than eagles, faster than Zephyr’s wings,
And also more hastening than a hawk, and yet the horrible
Earthworm and snail and slow tortoise of the swap
And the black beetle, offspring of foul dung, 
Defeat me in race’s contest more quickly than the saying.
40     I am heavier than lead: I verge on the weight of rocks;
I am lighter than a feather, to which a water-bug cedes;
For I am harder than flintstone, which pours dense flames from its insides,
Or iron, but softer than cooked insides.
For I bear no curls on the crown of my head
45     To adorn my forehead with pomp and my temples with hair, 
Although curled tresses rush from my head
More curled than hair curled by a curling iron.
Behold, I swell much fatter than the grease of sows,
When they repeatedly give their bodies acorn-bearing beech
50     And swineherds are made happy by the fattened flesh; 
But cruel famine tortures me, needy, with emaciation,
When, pale, I am forever deprived of rich feasts.
I am clear, I admit, brighter than Titan’s orb, 
Whiter than the snows when a cloud drops fleece like snow,
55     And much darker than the black shadows of the prison
And the secret shades which Tartarus encircles.
I am fashioned smooth and round like the orb of the stars
Or the sphere of a ball as well as the shape of a crystal;
And on the other hand I am held out like suspended silk cloth,
60     Stretched into thin thread or a vestment’s fibers.
See, I extend much father, miraculous to say, 
Than the six territories by which the wide world is measured;
Nothing throughout the world is below or above me 
Except the creator of things, controlling the world with his word.
65     I am bigger than the black whale in grey waves
And smaller than the little worm that furrows through corpses
And the humble mote that flickers in the sun’s rays. 
I advance on a hundred feet through grassy country
And absolutely never go on earth on foot.
70     Thus my wisdom surpasses that of wise men,
And yet the precious letter in books did not teach me,
Nor was I ever able to know what a syllable was.
I am drier than the summer heat of a flaming sun,
Dripping with dew, on the other hand I am wetter than a fountain’s stream;
75     I am much saltier than the waters of the swelling sea
And I move about fresher than the earths’ icy waters,
Decorated with the manifold appearance all the colours 
With which the present system of the world is adorned,
I am now wan, defrauded of all colour.
80     Pay attention, you who believe the words I say,
A wise teacher will barely be able to disclose them orally
And yet the skeptical reader should not deem them trifles!
I ask puffed-up wise men what name I enjoy.
HERE END THE RIDDLES.

Click to show riddle solution?
Creation


Notes:

This edition is based on Rudolf Ehwald, ed. Aldhelmi Opera Omnia. Monumenta Germaniae Historica, Auctores Antiquissimi, 15. Berlin, Weidmann, 1919, pages 59-150. Available online here



Tags: riddles  latin  Aldhelm